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Details of Grant 

EPSRC Reference: EP/T026219/1
Title: Flexible Hybrid Thermoelectric Materials
Principal Investigator: Nandhakumar, Dr IS
Other Investigators:
Beeby, Professor SP
Researcher Co-Investigators:
Project Partners:
Carrington Textiles Ltd European Thermodynamics Ltd Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research
Singapore A star Swansea University
Department: Sch of Chemistry
Organisation: University of Southampton
Scheme: Standard Research
Starts: 01 April 2020 Ends: 31 March 2023 Value (£): 609,079
EPSRC Research Topic Classifications:
Materials Characterisation Materials Synthesis & Growth
EPSRC Industrial Sector Classifications:
Manufacturing Electronics
Energy
Related Grants:
EP/T027711/1
Panel History:
Panel DatePanel NameOutcome
22 Jan 2020 EPSRC Physical Sciences - January 2020 Announced
Summary on Grant Application Form
Wearable technologies such as smart watches, smart glasses or even smart pacemakers have caused a paradigm shift in consumer electronics with huge potential in areas such as healthcare, fashion and entertainment (e.g. augmented reality glasses). Currently these devices are still powered by batteries needing frequent replacement or recharging, a key challenge holding back wearable electronics. Thermoelectric generators (TEGs) are an attractive alternative to batteries as they can generate up to several 100 microwatts power from heat (e.g. radiated from the human body), are safe and long-lasting with zero emissions. Current TEGs however are plagued by low efficiencies, high manufacturing costs, and are fabricated onto rigid substrates which makes it difficult to integrate them into many applications that require conformal installation. There is therefore considerable interest in the fabrication of flexible TEGs that can harvest energy from body heat for wearable applications and other heat sources. This project seeks to develop a new generation of thermoelectric (TE) hybrid materials for flexible TE energy harvesting applications by combining inorganic materials with controlled 3D nanostructures and organic conducting polymers (OCPs). The materials have not been realized to date and will be optimized to yield enhanced TE power factors (PFs).

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Organisation Website: http://www.soton.ac.uk