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Details of Grant 

EPSRC Reference: TS/I001751/1
Title: Inducing novel broad spectrum disease resistance in wheat
Principal Investigator: Cameron, Professor D
Other Investigators:
Burrell, Professor M Leake, Professor J
Researcher Co-Investigators:
Project Partners:
Department: Animal and Plant Sciences
Organisation: University of Sheffield
Scheme: Technology Programme
Starts: 01 October 2010 Ends: 30 September 2014 Value (£): 238,544
EPSRC Research Topic Classifications:
Crop protection
EPSRC Industrial Sector Classifications:
Food and Drink
Related Grants:
Panel History:  
Summary on Grant Application Form
This project will apply a novel high throughput screening methodology, combined with conventional breeding, to develop new wheat varieties in which broad spectrum tolerance and resistance to fungal pathogens and enhanced nutrient-use efficiency are simultaneously induced and selected via a novel mechanism. The UK farming industry spends about 30m on wheat fungicides, spraying an area of over 2 million hectares. This helps to maintain higher yields than for organically-grown wheat, but with significant financial and environmental costs. Now, implementation of the revision of 91/414/EEC means most of the effective fungicides (Cyproconazole, Fenbuconazole, Bitertanol, Carbendazim, Dinocap, Epoxiconazole, Fenbuconazole, Flusilazole, Iprodione, Mancozeb, Maneb, Metconazole, Quinoxyfen, Tebuconazole) against diseases of wheat are likely to be withdrawn, so that the risks of major crop failure are increased. This has serious implications for food security and farmer's incomes. The aim of this project is to combine recent advances in (1) fundamental plant biology, (2) high-throughput mass-spectrometry and (3) modern plant breeding techniques, in an innovative way to produce new varieties of wheat less dependant on pesticides and chemical inputs for optimal yields. The varieties will be selected with enhanced, and durable, broad spectrum resistance or tolerance to disease making them equally suited for use in conventional and organic farming systems. Field trials of candidate new varieties will be used to select the best variety for commercial development. Wheat will be used in this programme but, once implemented, the technology can be applied to many other crops.
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Further Information:  
Organisation Website: http://www.shef.ac.uk