EPSRC logo

Details of Grant 

EPSRC Reference: GR/S93783/01
Title: Conduction Velocity-Selective Recording With Cuff Electrodes in Vivo
Principal Investigator: Taylor, Professor J
Other Investigators:
Researcher Co-Investigators:
Project Partners:
Finetech Medical Ltd
Department: Electronic and Electrical Engineering
Organisation: University of Bath
Scheme: Standard Research (Pre-FEC)
Starts: 01 November 2004 Ends: 31 October 2007 Value (£): 172,374
EPSRC Research Topic Classifications:
Biomechanics & Rehabilitation Biomedical neuroscience
Med.Instrument.Device& Equip. VLSI Design
EPSRC Industrial Sector Classifications:
Healthcare Electronics
Related Grants:
GR/S93790/01
Panel History:  
Summary on Grant Application Form
Our objective is to improve the performance of surgically-implanted peripheral nerve recording so that more useful information can be extracted from the neural traffic than has been possible to date. In spite of the well-known practical advantages of cuff-electrodes, at present the output of such systems consists of the mixed responses to both motor and sensory fibres, and to fibres of all diameters. We have invented (and patented) a method for selective recording which allows nerve signals to be classified by conduction velocity (= fibre diameter), in addition to improving the signal-to-noise ratio compared to a conventional (tripolar) cuff. The method uses a Multi-electrode Cuff and linear signal processing. We expect it to have many applications in neuroprosthetics, providing feedback and commands (inputs).To show its value, the crucial demonstration is that a system does distinguish signals of different function that are carried in fibres of different diameter. We propose to test this by in vivo experiments in animals. The first, acute experiments will test our understanding with compound action potentials and then naturally-occurring neural signals after surgical preparation and under several well-defined experimental conditions. We should then be able to set the parameters of a DSP for real-time processing which will be used occasionally with chronically-implanted animals to distinguish cutaneous afferent from stretch receptor signals. We expect to show that the method remains viable when the cuff is encapsulated in the long-term.
Key Findings
This information can now be found on Gateway to Research (GtR) http://gtr.rcuk.ac.uk
Potential use in non-academic contexts
This information can now be found on Gateway to Research (GtR) http://gtr.rcuk.ac.uk
Impacts
Description This information can now be found on Gateway to Research (GtR) http://gtr.rcuk.ac.uk
Summary
Date Materialised
Sectors submitted by the Researcher
This information can now be found on Gateway to Research (GtR) http://gtr.rcuk.ac.uk
Project URL:  
Further Information:  
Organisation Website: http://www.bath.ac.uk