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Details of Grant 

EPSRC Reference: GR/S20611/01
Title: Phthalocyanine-Centred Metal Arrays as Magnetic Memories
Principal Investigator: Winpenny, Professor RE
Other Investigators:
McKeown, Professor N
Researcher Co-Investigators:
Project Partners:
Department: Chemistry
Organisation: University of Manchester, The
Scheme: Standard Research (Pre-FEC)
Starts: 01 September 2003 Ends: 31 August 2006 Value (£): 177,547
EPSRC Research Topic Classifications:
Chemical Structure Co-ordination Chemistry
Materials Characterisation Materials Synthesis & Growth
EPSRC Industrial Sector Classifications:
Chemicals No relevance to Underpinning Sectors
Electronics
Related Grants:
Panel History:  
Summary on Grant Application Form
The discovery that molecular species could retain magnetisation in the absence of a magnetic field has led to a great expansion in the investigation of the synthesis and magnetic properties of polymetallic molecular species. These molecules - termed single molecule magnets (SMMs) - represent the smallest possible magnetic storage device. The basis of this proposal is the synthesis of SMMs based on symmetrical phthalocyanines with four and eight aza-macrocycles fused to the periphery. With the introduction of suitable transition metal ions to these sites, e.g. Mn (III), and with alignment of their spins mediated by anti-ferromagnetic compling either to a low spin metal ion held in the central cavity of the phthalocyanine , e.g. Cu(II) or to an organic radical formed by oxidation of the phthalocyanine, a high spin complex will result. The crystal field about each ion will be controlled to align the tetragonal distortion axes, and hence maximise the anisotropy of the high spin complex. In addition unsymmetrical phthalocyanines with one or two fused macrocyles will be prepared to allow access to a simpler system for investigation of the crucial spin interactions. The di-, tri, penta- and nonameric metal arrays will be examined using magnetochemistry, EPR spectroscopy and electrochemistry. The magnetic behaviour of the most promising complexes will be investigated in detail through well-established collaborations with leading European groups.
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Organisation Website: http://www.man.ac.uk