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Details of Grant 

EPSRC Reference: GR/R41446/01
Title: The Impact and Shape of Habit on Crystal Aggregation.
Principal Investigator: Heywood, Professor B
Other Investigators:
Hounslow, Professor MJ
Researcher Co-Investigators:
Project Partners:
Department: Sch of Chemistry & Physics
Organisation: Keele University
Scheme: Standard Research (Pre-FEC)
Starts: 01 October 2001 Ends: 30 September 2004 Value (£): 82,016
EPSRC Research Topic Classifications:
Chemical Structure Particle Technology
EPSRC Industrial Sector Classifications:
No relevance to Underpinning Sectors Chemicals
Food and Drink Pharmaceuticals and Biotechnology
Related Grants:
GR/R41408/01
Panel History:  
Summary on Grant Application Form
Agglomeration is a critical factor in the development of stable solids during the formation of crystalline particulates in liquid media. However, despite widespread acknowledgement of its importance, the fundamental mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are poorly understood and, consequent) the capability to either manage or exploit the aggregation process has yet to be developed. Recent scientific advances now make it possible to coml a knowledge of the crystallo-chemical properties of particulates with newly developed process engineering strategies for describing the behaviour of populations of particles under industrial conditions. Firstly, an experimental protocol developed at Sheffield allows for the specific isolation of hydrodynamic forces from the influence of solution conditions during the on-line measurement and kinetic analysis of agglomerate formation in liquic media. Secondly, studies at Keele with well-defined single crystals have provided clear evidence for the specific influence of crystallographic form ul the ability of such particles to aggregate. Aside from the technical benefits to be gained from this new collaboration there exists the opportunity to address the limiting assumptions in current particle aggregation theory with data obtained using crystals of controlled habit and morphology. While t alone offers the prospect of considerable progress with a very high chance of success, the potential for further experimental challenge exists. The opportunity to evaluate how crystals can self-assemble under flowing, that is quasi industrial conditions, offers, at higher risk, a very important stepping stone in the exploration of how ordered agglomerates can be assembled in a quasi-industrial environment.
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Further Information:  
Organisation Website: http://www.keele.ac.uk