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Details of Grant 

EPSRC Reference: GR/R16853/01
Title: The Application of Boundary Integral Methods To Free-Surface Problems: Visit of Prof. C. Pozrikidis (Ucsd)
Principal Investigator: Matar, Professor OK
Other Investigators:
Lawrence, Professor CJ
Researcher Co-Investigators:
Project Partners:
Department: Department of Chemical Engineering
Organisation: Imperial College London
Scheme: Standard Research (Pre-FEC)
Starts: 16 January 2001 Ends: 15 October 2001 Value (£): 7,250
EPSRC Research Topic Classifications:
Fluid Dynamics Multiphase Flow
EPSRC Industrial Sector Classifications:
No relevance to Underpinning Sectors
Related Grants:
Panel History:  
Summary on Grant Application Form
The proposed work involves the use of Boundary Element Methods (BEM) for the solution of free-surface flow problems, which are of fundamental importance to industrial and biomedical applications. BEM is an efficient method for the solution of interfacial flow problems; it involves the solution of a set of integral equations at the interface only by discretisation of the interface into boundary elements, thereby leading to large reductions in storage and computational effort. The problems to be tackled are: the spreading of surfactant along a thin mucus-water bilayer, the dynamics of two immiscible liquids undergoing shear flow in a Couette device and the interaction of a turbulent fluid with an underlying soil layer. In the first problem we shall focus on how the viscoelastic rheology of the mucus layer affects the spreading characteristics within the context of Surfactant Replacement Therapy, a method of treatment of Respiratory Distress Syndrome involving the external delivery of surfactants into pulmonary airways. In the second, fundamental understanding of the spatio-temporal evolution of the interfacial shape of a water drop in oil will be achieved as a function of system parameters, which is important within the context of droplet deformation in emulsion technology. In the final problem, we shall focus on determining the set of conditions for the genesis of interfacial waves due to the interaction of turbulent stresses in the flow of water over an underlying soil layer. This is important in the context of cleaning flows, wherein the interfacial waves may lead to detachment of the underlying soil.
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Organisation Website: http://www.imperial.ac.uk