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Details of Grant 

EPSRC Reference: GR/R12800/01
Title: Downward Bubbly Flow In Microchannels
Principal Investigator: Simmons, Professor M
Other Investigators:
Researcher Co-Investigators:
Project Partners:
Department: Chemical Engineering
Organisation: University of Birmingham
Scheme: Fast Stream
Starts: 20 April 2001 Ends: 19 October 2004 Value (£): 58,885
EPSRC Research Topic Classifications:
Fluid Dynamics Multiphase Flow
EPSRC Industrial Sector Classifications:
Electronics No relevance to Underpinning Sectors
Chemicals
Related Grants:
Panel History:  
Summary on Grant Application Form
Two-phase gas-liquid flows has been extensively studied on a macroscopic (cm-m) scale as a result of interest from oil, gas and power generation industries. Increasing interest in flows on a mm-cm scale arises from the wish to intensify process plant to produce products which have been traditionally Made in large-scale stirred tanks or bubble columns. This intensification has been shown to have significant benefits in terms of process economics, reaction selectivity and hence product quality. These processes can all involve two-phase gas-liquid flows and fundamental knowledge of the two-phase hydrodynamics is essential in order to understand the mass transfer of the reacting species. The catalytic hydrogenation of 2-butynediol in a monolith Concurrent Downflow Contact Reactor (CDCR) has been shown to have different measured reaction kinetics when compared with other reactor types. In this reactor, a highly agitated gas-liquid bubbly mixture is created and passed downwards through the monolith channels.The purpose of this protect is to understand the behaviour of this gas-liquid mixture by performing visualisation studies using high speed videography and Particle Image Velocimetry (PM, to understand how the bubbles behave as they enter the monolith channels, and the flow regimes of the gas and liquid once inside. These data will be used to develop mechanistic mathematical models of the hydrodynamics, which can be used to gain a greater understanding of the mass transfer processes inside the channels.
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Organisation Website: http://www.bham.ac.uk