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Details of Grant 

EPSRC Reference: GR/L37328/01
Title: ULTRA-LINEAR DEVICES AND CIRCUITS FOR MICROWAVE FREQUENCIES
Principal Investigator: Thayne, Professor I
Other Investigators:
Beaumont, Professor S Stanley, Professor C Beaumont, Professor S
Asenov, Professor A Sewell, Professor J
Researcher Co-Investigators:
Project Partners:
Department: Electronics and Electrical Engineering
Organisation: University of Glasgow
Scheme: Standard Research (Pre-FEC)
Starts: 01 August 1997 Ends: 30 November 2000 Value (£): 327,450
EPSRC Research Topic Classifications:
RF & Microwave Technology
EPSRC Industrial Sector Classifications:
Communications
Related Grants:
Panel History:  
Summary on Grant Application Form
The emergence of wireless and satellite broadband systems requires ultra-low distortion circuits and devices to minimise interchannel interference and modulation corruption arising from nonlinearities in the active device. These issues will be addressed through the combination of low distortion circuit design techniques (notably the Derivative Superposition Technique at UCL) and intrinsically low distortion devices (to be developed in Glasgow). In this proposal, the Glasgow role is twofold. Firstly, we will produce Derivative Superposition based demonstrator MMICs using the Glasgow pHEMT process, permitting the design technique to be evaluated. Secondly, we will use physics based modelling to design transistors with greater intrinsic linearity than the existing pHEMT devices. Preliminary simulations have identified a doped channel pHEMT structure as a promising candidate. The optimised material structure will be produced by the Glasgow MBE group and transistors fabricated and tested to verify the predictions of the modelling. We will then combine the Derivative Superposition design technique with the low distortion devices to produce ultra-high linearity broadband MMICs. Next, multiple channel pHEMTs for high power, high linearity applications will be investigate as outlined above. Once verified these devices will be used to produce high power ultra-linear Derivative Superposition MMIC demonstrators
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Organisation Website: http://www.gla.ac.uk