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Details of Grant 

EPSRC Reference: GR/K13011/01
Title: NEW INORGANIC MATERIALS FOR RECHARGEABLE LITHIUM BATTERIES
Principal Investigator: Bruce, Professor P
Other Investigators:
Researcher Co-Investigators:
Project Partners:
Department: Chemistry
Organisation: University of St Andrews
Scheme: Standard Research (Pre-FEC)
Starts: 01 December 1994 Ends: 30 November 1997 Value (£): 153,314
EPSRC Research Topic Classifications:
Energy Storage Materials Synthesis & Growth
EPSRC Industrial Sector Classifications:
No relevance to Underpinning Sectors Electronics
Related Grants:
Panel History:  
Summary on Grant Application Form
Interest in rechargeable lithium batteries for both electric traction and consumer electronic products has never been greater. The first commercial cell for the latter market is now available world-wide from Sony; it uses the intercalaction compound LiCoO2 as positive electrode. We have developed and patented a superior and cheaper alternative based on the spinel LiMn24. We are collaborating with UK industry and as a result prototype batteries using our new material are being tested by Dowty Batteries and BNR (Europe). Despite this success it is widely acknowledged that there is an overwhelming need to develop new rechargeable lithium batteries which can store much more energy than those based on LiCoO2 or LiMn24. Such a leap forward in battery performance is fundamentally dependent on materials research. The aim of the present proposal is to establish a materials research programme geared to the synthesis and characterisation of new lithium manganese oxide and lithium manganese iron oxide phases from which significantly more lithium can be removed and reinserted per transition metal ion than is the case for lice or LiMn24. This in turn would lead to rechargeable lithium batteries capable of storing much more energy on each charge per unit weight and volume than those currently under development. The manganese andiron oxide systems are the best in which to search for new battery materials because they are cheaper and most environmentally friendly than the alternatives such as Co, Ni or V oxides, both these issues are crucial to a successful consumer product for the 21st century.
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Organisation Website: http://www.st-and.ac.uk