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Details of Grant 

EPSRC Reference: EP/T011726/1
Title: Functional Hydrogen-Bonded Self-Sorting Networks
Principal Investigator: Wilson, Professor AJ
Other Investigators:
Burnett, Dr AD
Researcher Co-Investigators:
Project Partners:
Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam
Department: Sch of Chemistry
Organisation: University of Leeds
Scheme: Standard Research
Starts: 01 March 2020 Ends: 28 February 2023 Value (£): 454,259
EPSRC Research Topic Classifications:
Catalysis & Applied Catalysis Chemical Synthetic Methodology
EPSRC Industrial Sector Classifications:
No relevance to Underpinning Sectors
Related Grants:
Panel History:
Panel DatePanel NameOutcome
11 Sep 2019 EPSRC Physical Sciences - September 2019 Announced
Summary on Grant Application Form
In biology, multiple processes occur simultaneously to perform the functions necessary for life e.g. manufacture and destruction of cells. To do this, multicomponent architectures comprising several different components or building blocks (e.g. proteins) must assemble with exquisite control at the right time and in the right place. Such multiple component architectures may also need to disassemble and reassemble into new architectures with different function at another time. These systems can therefore be considered as networks that form different functional architectures in an environmentally responsive manner. What makes the assembly and function of such architectures possible is self-sorting - the ability of one component to recognise its correct partner component(s) in the presence of many others. Synthetic chemistry is not yet capable of mimicking functional self-sorting networks. This research will address this challenge and develop the first non-natural (synthetic) functional self-sorting networks. We will use patterns of hydrogen-bonding motifs (HBMs), which mimic the DNA base pairs used to store genetic information, to construct self-sorting networks. We will then use these HBMS to control a series of catalytic and iterative synthetic chemistry processes. In the long term such methods could be used to prepare industrially important fine chemicals and pharmaceuticals in a similar manner to assembly lines used in modern manufacturing, offering advantages in complexity and efficiency.
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Organisation Website: http://www.leeds.ac.uk