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Details of Grant 

EPSRC Reference: EP/S03286X/1
Title: Digital twin-based Bilateral Teleautonomous System for Nuclear Remote Operation
Principal Investigator: Carrasco, Dr J
Other Investigators:
Yin, Dr H
Researcher Co-Investigators:
Project Partners:
Department: Electrical and Electronic Engineering
Organisation: University of Manchester, The
Scheme: Standard Research
Starts: 01 June 2019 Ends: 30 November 2021 Value (£): 252,932
EPSRC Research Topic Classifications:
Control Engineering Energy - Nuclear
Instrumentation Eng. & Dev.
EPSRC Industrial Sector Classifications:
Energy Electronics
Related Grants:
EP/S032894/1
Panel History:
Panel DatePanel NameOutcome
13 Mar 2019 UK ROK Phase 2 Prioritisation March 2019 Announced
Summary on Grant Application Form
The final goal has been incubated from the bottom line truth about the deployment telerobotic technology for real-world nuclear applications; even after half a century of innovation, there is no tangible telerobotic technology that is adequate for deployment for real-world nuclear applications such as decontamination and dismantling of nuclear facilities. Bilateral teleoperators and other sensor-based telerobotic systems are too complex and fragile, and unilateral teleoperators are too inefficient. What is needed to this end is a new telerobotic system that can utilize simple and robust slave hardware and yet perform dexterous manipulation via (potentially degraded) low-bandwidth communication. To this end, a new teleoperation method, namely 'digital twin-based tele-autonomy', which incorporates a digital replica of the world (i.e., digital twin) and local autonomy is proposed.

The overall research objective of this project is to implement a new teleoperation method, namely digital twin-based bilateral tele-autonomy, and demonstrate its applicability for civil nuclear applications. By integration of simulation in the digital twin and local autonomous behaviours, the performance goal is to achieve dexterous teleoperation with high precision and efficiency by extracting more performance from simple and robust robotic equipment.

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Further Information:  
Organisation Website: http://www.man.ac.uk