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Details of Grant 

EPSRC Reference: EP/N510087/1
Title: Occoris - Self Activating Smart Inhaler
Principal Investigator: Murnane, Professor D
Other Investigators:
Hutter, Dr V
Researcher Co-Investigators:
Project Partners:
Department: School of Life and Medical Sciences
Organisation: University of Hertfordshire
Scheme: Technology Programme
Starts: 01 October 2016 Ends: 31 May 2018 Value (£): 138,754
EPSRC Research Topic Classifications:
Drug Formulation & Delivery Macro-molecular delivery
Particle Technology
EPSRC Industrial Sector Classifications:
Pharmaceuticals and Biotechnology Healthcare
Related Grants:
Panel History:  
Summary on Grant Application Form
The global burden of obstructive lung diseases (OLDs) is significant. Almost 300 million individuals worldwide are affected

by asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is predicted to be the third-leading cause of death by 2020. Drugcontaining

aerosols are the gold-standard therapy in the treatment of OLDs. Drug delivery to the deep lung remains an

unmet challenge using existing products. A key challenge to be addressed is the requirement for delivery of an aerosol that

targets the diseased airways and minimizes throat deposition, the most frequent cause of side-effects from inhalation

therapy.

Existing inhaled therapies have several drawbacks:

1. Nebulizer formulations are suitable for patients with severe OLDs, but they are expensive, difficult to operate, require

electricity and are usually non-portable;

2. Pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs) produce aerosols with a size suitable for targeting the diseased airways

deep in the lung, but are difficult to use correctly, are only suitable for delivering small doses, and between 30 - 60 % of the

drug deposits in the throat;

3. Most dry powder inhalers (DPIs) are passive devices where drug is aerosolized under the force generated when the

patient inhales through the device. OLD patients are often unable to inhale with sufficient force to generate an aerosol

suitable for deposition in the target affected airways, rather than in the upper airways;

4. It is complex to achieve uniformity of dose content and homogeneous lung dosing when manufacturing DPIs, particularly

for high dose drugs such as antibiotics. Advanced formulation and device engineering are required to achieve manufacture

of functional DPI products. Effective devices often require energy input such as electromechanical force, or compressed

air.
Key Findings
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Potential use in non-academic contexts
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Summary
Date Materialised
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Project URL:  
Further Information:  
Organisation Website: http://www.herts.ac.uk