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Details of Grant 

EPSRC Reference: EP/N024206/1
Title: Combined Carbon Capture and Conversion using Multifunctional Porous Materials
Principal Investigator: Petit, Dr C
Other Investigators:
Researcher Co-Investigators:
Project Partners:
Department: Department of Chemical Engineering
Organisation: Imperial College London
Scheme: First Grant - Revised 2009
Starts: 01 July 2016 Ends: 30 June 2017 Value (£): 98,626
EPSRC Research Topic Classifications:
Energy Storage Materials Characterisation
Materials Synthesis & Growth
EPSRC Industrial Sector Classifications:
Energy
Related Grants:
Panel History:
Panel DatePanel NameOutcome
18 Feb 2016 EPSRC Physical Sciences Materials - February 2016 Announced
Summary on Grant Application Form
The rapid increase in CO2 emissions from industrial sources has been considered as one of the main causes of climate change. The reduction of CO2 emissions can be achieved by improving energy efficiency, implementing renewable carbon-free energy sources, and developing carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technologies. Worldwide energy use will continue increasing; thus, CCUS could provide an immediate solution to the global carbon imbalance. Until now, the CCUS technologies have been developed independently of one another, which has resulted in complex and economically challenged large-scale designs. For instance, questions like: "How do we link CO2 capture and CO2 conversion technologies?" or "What is the optimal form in which captured CO2 be provided to the CO2 conversion unit?" are often left for later considerations. A CCUS platform that facilitates the direct use of captured CO2 as a chemical feedstock would thus represent a significant advancement in the field, and lead to more sustainable operations. In this endeavour, multifunctional materials have a key role to play owing to their structural, mechanical and chemical versatility.

With this in mind, the current project aims at developing advanced porous materials that can be used to both capture CO2 and subsequently convert it to useful chemicals using sunlight. When converting CO2, the materials are simultaneously regenerated, thereby enhancing the sustainability of the overall process.

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Organisation Website: http://www.imperial.ac.uk