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Details of Grant 

EPSRC Reference: EP/M020584/1
Title: Nanoscale Engineering of Dyes for Liquid Crystal Device Applications
Principal Investigator: Goodby, Professor JW
Other Investigators:
Cowling, Dr SJ Saez, Dr IM Moore, Dr J
Researcher Co-Investigators:
Project Partners:
Department: Chemistry
Organisation: University of York
Scheme: Standard Research
Starts: 01 June 2015 Ends: 30 November 2018 Value (£): 702,457
EPSRC Research Topic Classifications:
Complex fluids & soft solids
EPSRC Industrial Sector Classifications:
Electronics
Related Grants:
Panel History:
Panel DatePanel NameOutcome
12 Feb 2015 EPSRC Physical Sciences Materials - February 2015 Announced
Summary on Grant Application Form
This project, entitled the "Nanoscale Engineering of Dyes for Liquid Crystal Device Applications", will tackle an adventurous scientific programme aimed at the "rational design and controlled molecular engineering" of dichroic dyes to create new classes of functional soft materials for a variety of applications. The specific outcome of the science of the programme will be the creation of new dichroic dyes by rational design strategies, including computer modelling approaches, that will ultimately drive the synthesis of target materials and their incorporation into liquid crystals hosts. The design methodology will provide new insights into self-organisation and self-assembly processes in condensed fluids, which are expected to be generally applicable to molecular materials, and will be of interest to chemists, physicists, engineers and theoreticians alike. In particular, it is also intended that the work will lead to the creation of new materials for applications in novel light scattering display devices for use outdoors, such as tablet computers, and in bistable devices, which can display information without the need for continuously applied electric fields.

The materials we intend to investigate include molecular materials, dimers, and supermolecular dyes that have nanosegregated structures. The target materials may be liquid crystals or may be designed as dopants to add to liquid crystal matrices. In addition, for more complex systems, such as supermolecules, the materials may be composed of both mesomorphic and chromophoric entities. We will use a variety of chromophores, eg anthraquinone, perylene, etc to give materials with a range of tunable colours that will be created by the nanoscale engineering of molecular structures and by the design of dye mixtures.

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Organisation Website: http://www.york.ac.uk