EPSRC logo

Details of Grant 

EPSRC Reference: EP/I002936/1
Title: International Collaboration in Chemistry: Novel Approaches to Molecular Assembly in Polymers for Solar Energy Conversion
Principal Investigator: Heeney, Professor MJ
Other Investigators:
McCulloch, Professor I
Researcher Co-Investigators:
Project Partners:
Department: Dept of Chemistry
Organisation: Imperial College London
Scheme: Standard Research
Starts: 04 October 2010 Ends: 31 July 2014 Value (£): 241,168
EPSRC Research Topic Classifications:
Materials Characterisation Materials Processing
Materials Synthesis & Growth Solar Technology
EPSRC Industrial Sector Classifications:
Energy
Related Grants:
Panel History:
Panel DatePanel NameOutcome
30 Sep 2010 NSF/EPSRC Chemistry Proposals 2009 Announced
Summary on Grant Application Form
Conversion of light to electrical energy is critical for the future global energy demands with photovolatic cells, fabricated using semiconducting polymers, representing a low-cost solution for energy conversion. This international collaborative study aims to develop new semiconducting polymers that enable photovoltaic cells with controlled morphology and interfacial properties. Novel materials will be developed that are compatible with soft nanoimprint lithographic methods and will be used to form nanostructured all polymer photovoltaic cells. Charge separation in organic semiconductors occurs at nanoscale molecular heterojunctions necessitating the need for control of both molecular structure and interfacial morphological structure. Crosslinkable semiconducting polymers optimized for nanoimprinting will be synthesized and used to form photovoltaics with structurally controlled heterojunctions. These nanostructures will also be used to guide formation of molecular interlayers that improve the charge separation process. Advanced x-ray scattering methods will be used to probe the resulting morphology in nanoimprinted polymers. Optoelectronic characterization of organic photovoltaic cells with controlled interfacial properties will reveal new insight into the charge generation process at organic molecular heterojunctions.
Key Findings
This information can now be found on Gateway to Research (GtR) http://gtr.rcuk.ac.uk
Potential use in non-academic contexts
This information can now be found on Gateway to Research (GtR) http://gtr.rcuk.ac.uk
Impacts
Description This information can now be found on Gateway to Research (GtR) http://gtr.rcuk.ac.uk
Summary
Date Materialised
Sectors submitted by the Researcher
This information can now be found on Gateway to Research (GtR) http://gtr.rcuk.ac.uk
Project URL:  
Further Information:  
Organisation Website: http://www.imperial.ac.uk