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Details of Grant 

EPSRC Reference: EP/D502411/1
Title: The formation and occurrence of haloacetic acids in drinking water
Principal Investigator: Graham, Professor NJD
Other Investigators:
Templeton, Professor MR Nieuwenhuijsen, Dr MJ Collins, Professor CD
Researcher Co-Investigators:
Project Partners:
Anglian Water Drinking Water Inspectorate Scottish Water
Severn Trent Plc Group United Utilities
Department: Environmental Science and Technology
Organisation: Imperial College London
Scheme: Standard Research (Pre-FEC)
Starts: 01 October 2005 Ends: 31 March 2009 Value (£): 237,470
EPSRC Research Topic Classifications:
Water Engineering
EPSRC Industrial Sector Classifications:
Water
Related Grants:
Panel History:  
Summary on Grant Application Form
Haloacetic acids (HAAs) are formed when chlorine reacts with organic matter in waters during chlorination of public drinking water and swimming pools. In the US various studies have been carried out to assess the levels and determinands of HAAs, and the US Environmental Protection Agency has established a maximum contaminant levels at 60 microgram/litre. In the UK and Europe little, if any, information is available on HAA levels or the potential for their production. Therefore is it is not possible at present to know if these compounds are of significance or not in UK drinking waters. A major factor in the formation of HAAs is the nature of the organic matter involved in the chlorine reaction but little fundamental research has been carried out on this to-date.We propose a study to undertake fundamental laboratory investigations of the kinetics of HAA formation and to measure HAAs in drinking water to obtain information on variation and determinands of HAAs in UK drinking water with a focus on three water supply systems (representing a range of water sources). The work will be carried out in conjunction with four water companies and the UK Drinking Water Inspectorate (DWI). The work will provide data for the water industry, regulators, researchers and consumers on this potentially important group of compounds and the prediction of their production. This will significantly improve our current knowledge of the nature of HAA formation, their presence in UK drinking water, and protection measures to reduce their formation. The project is a direct response to a recent report to the DWI, which recommended a 'high priority' classification (the highest category) for HAAs on the list of regulatory chemical parameters that should be included in the routine monitoring of drinking water.
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