EPSRC logo

Details of Grant 

EPSRC Reference: EP/C536851/1
Title: Improved brain connectivity measurements using in viro MR diffusion tractography
Principal Investigator: Clark, Professor CA
Other Investigators:
Hill, Professor DL Gadian, Professor DG Alexander, Professor D
Researcher Co-Investigators:
Dr P Batchelor
Project Partners:
Department: Institute of Child Health
Organisation: UCL
Scheme: Standard Research (Pre-FEC)
Starts: 01 April 2005 Ends: 31 December 2008 Value (£): 206,626
EPSRC Research Topic Classifications:
Image & Vision Computing Med.Instrument.Device& Equip.
EPSRC Industrial Sector Classifications:
Healthcare
Related Grants:
Panel History:  
Summary on Grant Application Form
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide remarkable pictures of the human brain, delineating not only its internal structures, but also a number of features of brain physiology. MRI has the important advantage of being entirely non-invasive, with no known biologically hazardous effects. The rapidly developing MRI modality of diffusion imaging offers a unique means of probing the structural arrangement of tissue at the cellular level. This techinque can now be used to map the path of white matter tracts in the brain in vivo non-invasively, using so-called tractography methods. Such techniques open up the possibility of studying the connectivity of the brain in vivo. However, diffusion tractography as currently implemented has a number of major problems, which makes the results obtained unreliable in many cases, limiting their clinically utility. In particular, current methods fail to properly characterise areas with multiple crossing white matter tracts. This proposal addresses key remaining deficiencies of diffusion tractography, with the aim of increasing the accuracy and robustness of this methodology, and with the final objective of allowing the robust assessment of the degree of connection between different areas of the brain. Our approach will result in an integrated acquisition and analysis strategy that will have accepable scan time and computing time to make it clinically usable. In this way, our work will lead to an improvement of MRI diffusion techniques in many areas of neurology, neurosurgery, and cognitive neuroscience, and speed up their translation from research applications to clinical use.
Key Findings
This information can now be found on Gateway to Research (GtR) http://gtr.rcuk.ac.uk
Potential use in non-academic contexts
This information can now be found on Gateway to Research (GtR) http://gtr.rcuk.ac.uk
Impacts
Description This information can now be found on Gateway to Research (GtR) http://gtr.rcuk.ac.uk
Summary
Date Materialised
Sectors submitted by the Researcher
This information can now be found on Gateway to Research (GtR) http://gtr.rcuk.ac.uk
Project URL:  
Further Information:  
Organisation Website: