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Details of Grant 

EPSRC Reference: EP/C51789X/1
Title: A Novel Biosynthetic Bandage for Corneal Wound Repair
Principal Investigator: Rose, Professor FRA
Other Investigators:
Tighe, Dr PJ Dua, Professor H Shakesheff, Professor K
Researcher Co-Investigators:
Project Partners:
Department: Sch of Pharmacy
Organisation: University of Nottingham
Scheme: First Grant Scheme Pre-FEC
Starts: 01 October 2005 Ends: 31 December 2007 Value (£): 125,370
EPSRC Research Topic Classifications:
Tissue Engineering
EPSRC Industrial Sector Classifications:
Healthcare
Related Grants:
Panel History:  
Summary on Grant Application Form
Corneal blindness due to trauma and ulceration are believed to be responsible for nearly 2 million new cases of blindness every year. The amniotic membrane (AM) is an established method for replacing or repairing such damaged eye tissue. It protects the eye from infection and reduces inflammation whilst stimulating repair of the wound bed. Although clinical results are encouraging, the clinical outcome is variable and therefore permanent visual impairment, if not blindness, could occur in those patients where this treatment fails. The unpredictable nature of this treatment is thought to be due to donor variation and the different methods of preparing and storing the AM for clinical use. There is therefore a great clinical need to improve this treatment by generating a synthetic alternative that will provide a reliable and consistent wound healing response. We propose to develop a novel biodegradable hydrogel (similar to that used for soft contact lenses) that will promote cell adhesion and migration, will contain naturally occurring antibiotics to prevent infection, and growth factors that will stimulate new tissue formation. This bench-to-clinic research proposal combines the expertise of clinicians, biologists and materials scientists to develop a novel treatment for corneal repair. The clinical reliability of such a biosynthetic corneal bandage will no doubt make a significant clinical impact with a direct benefit to the patient.
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Further Information:  
Organisation Website: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk