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Details of Grant 

EPSRC Reference: EP/C509080/1
Title: Fuzzy Dice: To what accuracy can pept track multiple tracers?
Principal Investigator: Fryer, Professor PJ
Other Investigators:
Seville, Professor JP Parker, Professor DJ
Researcher Co-Investigators:
Project Partners:
Department: Chemical Engineering
Organisation: University of Birmingham
Scheme: Standard Research (Pre-FEC)
Starts: 04 June 2005 Ends: 03 June 2007 Value (£): 104,911
EPSRC Research Topic Classifications:
Instrumentation Eng. & Dev. Multiphase Flow
EPSRC Industrial Sector Classifications:
Food and Drink Pharmaceuticals and Biotechnology
Manufacturing Chemicals
Related Grants:
Panel History:  
Summary on Grant Application Form
PEPT (Positron Emission Particle Tracking) has been developed to allow the position and velocity of a radioactive tracer particle to be identified, even through several centimetres of metal. It has been used to track single tracers in powder mixers, stirred vessels and food flows. The major drawback of the technique is that each measurement is fuzzy, and it can only follow a single tracer at any one time. There is evidence that it is possible to track several particles at one time. This would enable new science and engineering to be done, such as following the rotation rate of particles in mixers and flows. However, the physics is such that the position of the particle has to be inferred as the centre of a set of detection events. It might thus be impossible to detect multiple tracers under conditions which are of practical value - the detectable spacing of the tracers might, in practice, be so large that the method cannot be used to study engineering problems. Experimental and computational work will develop ways of following multiple tracers. We will do this first in straight line and rotating flows. The final test system will be to use PEPT to follow the movement of model dice inside a sealed vessel. Depending on the scale and frequency of detection that is possible the results will show how the method could be used to solve industrialproblems.
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Organisation Website: http://www.bham.ac.uk