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Details of Grant 

EPSRC Reference: DT/E005055/1
Title: Power Electronics for Adverse High Temperature Environments (PEATE)
Principal Investigator: Wright, Professor NG
Other Investigators:
Researcher Co-Investigators:
Project Partners:
Corac Group Plc
Department: Electrical, Electronic & Computer Eng
Organisation: Newcastle University
Scheme: Technology Programme
Starts: 01 October 2006 Ends: 30 September 2008 Value (£): 217,244
EPSRC Research Topic Classifications:
Power Electronics
EPSRC Industrial Sector Classifications:
Transport Systems and Vehicles Electronics
Related Grants:
DT/E005195/1
Panel History:  
Summary on Grant Application Form
This S2B Basic Research Project is focussed on the development of a family of power electronic devices based on SiC technology for application in hostile environments of high temperature and pressure. Compressors for down-well operation in the gas production industry are required to work in the well ambient, which is typically in the range 100 to 200 C at pressures of up to 90 bar. Ratings for the compressor are up to 500 kW, the compressor being supplied through a power electronic drive from a 2.4 kV dc-buss using devices rated at 3.3 kV and 50 A.Conventional Si-based power electronics is limited to maximum operating junction temperatures of less than 150 C, giving a maximum down-hole ambient ceiling of around 105 C. This combination of relatively high voltage, low current and high temperature lends itself to the current and near future capability of SiC and it thus forms an ideal proof-of-concept demonstrator The overall aim of the project is to investigate technologies that will enable the development of a power electronic converter for a DGC that can operate in a gas ambient temperatures of up to 150 C. This aim will be realised through a co-ordinated programme of work that addresses semiconductor technology, packaging technology, heat transfer, converter control and reliability in seven technical work packages. Although the programme is directed at a potential application in a down-well gas compressor (DGC) for pressure boosting in gas wells, the results of this project will find application in all extreme temperature environments in which SiC technology could play a future role including aerospace, military, energy, automotive, transmission and distribution.
Key Findings
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Potential use in non-academic contexts
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Impacts
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Summary
Date Materialised
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Project URL: http://www.ncl.ac.uk/eece/research/groups/etm/etm-sic.htm
Further Information:  
Organisation Website: http://www.ncl.ac.uk